Prepare your artist’s statement

The document listed in the course notes as a help to preparing my artist’s statements either does not exist or the site is so slow that nothing ever comes back. However I have found plenty of examples of photographers artist’s statements, as well as ‘how to’ guides.

This is one I found particularly helpful
https://photography.tutsplus.com/articles/how-to-write-an-artist-statement-and-why-its-so-important–cms-27632

This was also useful though took a lot longer to say largely the same things
https://www.format.com/magazine/resources/art/how-to-write-artist-statement

With the suggested principles in mind I have written the statement below. The Format guide suggested using Hemingway Editor (http://www.hemingwayapp.com/) to review the text but I found this wants to encourage a much more simplistic sentence construction than I would like, so have ignored any advice from there.

As a photography student quite a lot of my practice is driven by the course requirements. I use the required topics to explore my own artistic sensibilities, to tease out where my own sympathies lie. I try to avoid a dogmatic approach to my work, so that any starting topic may become very different by the end. In that sense my work is constantly evolving. I explore different techniques and approaches to both the taking of photographs and the subsequent presentation.
I work almost exclusively in colour rather than monochrome, as I feel that this makes photography more three-dimensional. I am interested in small, cumulative effects of photographs rather than any large-scale grand statement of a single image.
In our increasingly polarised society I am interested in in-between spaces. I want to use photography to explore meeting points, places where different lives and environments interact. A primary influence on my work is “Edgelands” by Paul Farley and Michael Symmons Roberts. I want to explore intermediate spaces in all aspects of life so I do not limit my understanding of edgelands to just the physical manifestation. Another influence is Martin Parr’s ability to observe modern life in a manner that is simultaneously sympathetic and sardonic.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.